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An Incredible Hand Painted Font Demonstration by Glen Weisgerber typography pinstriping painting

An Incredible Hand Painted Font Demonstration by Glen Weisgerber typography pinstriping painting

Self-taught artist Glen Weisgerber is a master pinstriper who has been in business since the early 1970s painting all matter of truck lettering, logo design, pinstriping, guitar painting and bike customizations. This summer Airbrush Action Magazine filmed Weisgerber doing a number of different hand lettering tutorials including single stroke lettering, and chrome lettering. It’s almost a miracle to see each letterform leave his paintbrush so fully formed and perfect. If I was asked to make a list of 100 guesses of what this man was about to demonstrate based on his looks alone, I don’t think pinstriping would have crossed my mind.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/H0jUHwFza_4/

MrKiff · Oct 21 '13

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

WISH: A Monumental 11 Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez Gerada portraits land art Belfast

Unveiled several days ago in Belfast, Northern Ireland as part of the Belfast Festival, WISH is the latest public art project by Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, known for his monumentally scaled portraits in public spaces. The image depicted is of an anonymous Belfast girl and is so large it can only be viewed from the highest points in Belfast or an airplane.

Several years in the making, WISH was first plotted on a grid using state-of-the-art Topcon GPS technology and 30,000 manually placed wooden stakes in Belfast’s Titanic Quarter. The portrait was then “drawn” with aid of volunteers who helped place nearly 8 million pounds of natural materials including soil, sand, and rock over a period of four weeks. Rodríguez-Gerada says of the endeavor:

Working at very large scales becomes a personal challenge but it also allows me to bring attention to important social issues, the size of the piece is intrinsic to the value of its message. Creativity is always applied in order to define an intervention made only with local materials, with no environmental impact, that works in harmony with the location.

The project was made possible by several local businesses, most notably McLaughlin & Harvey, P.T McWilliams, Tobermore and Lagan Construction who generously donated materials, tools, machinery, staff, soil, sand and stone. WISH will be up through at least December and local residents already have a nickname for it: The Face from Space. (via Arrested Motion)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/lQuaQlSHrVI/

MrKiff · Oct 20 '13

Banksy in New York, Day 20: Upper West Side street art art

Banksy paid a visit to the Upper West Side for the 20th day in his Better Out than In residency in New York. The plain black stencil depicts a small boy holding a giant hammer, effectively turning an outdoor fire alarm into an impromptu high striker game.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/4Rp9Sum4Yrc/

MrKiff · Oct 20 '13

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler sculpture multiples geometric currency

Artist Robert Wechsler (previously) was recently comissioned by the The New Yorker to create a series of coin sculptures for their October 14th money-themed edition. Wechsler used a jeweler’s saw to cut precise notches in coins from various currencies and then joined them together in several geometric forms. While nine pieces were selected for the magazine, a total of 22 were created, all of which can be seen in his Money gallery. (via Colossal Submissions)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/MuQxsPtItng/

MrKiff · Oct 19 '13

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

An Illustrated Book by Dulk Wins 2nd Annual Brussels in Shorts Graphic Short Story Competition illustration Belgium

Now in its second year, Brussels in Shorts is an international graphic short story competition that invites illustrators and artist from around the world to create a predominantly visual story set against contemporary Brussels. The winners this year were graphic artist Antonio Segura Donat (a.k.a. Dulk) and brother Carlos out of Valencia, Spain who created this superbly illustrated short story titled Zomeravonden (Summer Evenings) based on sketches made while visiting the city center. This book and nine others were on view at the Belgian Comic Strip Center back in February. You can see much more of Dulk’s work over on Facebook. (via Behance)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/yzRVHdWDRIg/

MrKiff · Oct 18 '13

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Essence of elephants. Greg du Toit, South Africa. Grand Title Winner Wildlife Photographer of the Year, 2013.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions natureMother. Udayan Rao Pawar, India. Grand Title Winner Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (11-14 years), 2013.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
The flight path. Connor Steganison, Canada.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Lucky Pounce. Connor Stefanison, Canada.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
The water bear. Paul Souders, USA.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Dive Buddy. Luis Javier Sandoval, Mexico.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Snow moment. Jasper Doest, The Netherlands.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Lionfish Bait. Alex Tattersall, UK.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions natureFeeding of the five thousand. Yossi Eshbol, Israel.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
The greeting. Richard Packwood, UK. Nature in Black and White: Winner.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Freeze frame. Etienne Francey, Switzerland.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions nature
Fish-eye view. Theo Bosboom, The Netherlands.

The results of the 2013 Wildlife Photographer of the Year have just been announced and there are some really phenomenal images worth exploring. The annual competition now in its 49th year is led by two UK institutions, the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide, who collectively received 43,000 photos from 96 countries this year. The photos will begin an international tour in the UK starting in November and you can find exhibition times and dates here.

The first two images shown above, Essence of elephants by Greg du Toit of South Africa and Mother by Udayan Rao Pawar of India are the two grand title winners. The rest of the photos are a mix of both winners and runner-up selections, and you can read much more about each photograph over at Wildlife Photographer of the Year. (via My Modern Met)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/eHiFHUimP88/

MrKiff · Oct 18 '13

Moth: A New Woodcut Print from Tugboat Printshop wood prints wood posters and prints moths illustration butterflies

Moth: A New Woodcut Print from Tugboat Printshop wood prints wood posters and prints moths illustration butterflies

Moth: A New Woodcut Print from Tugboat Printshop wood prints wood posters and prints moths illustration butterflies

Moth: A New Woodcut Print from Tugboat Printshop wood prints wood posters and prints moths illustration butterflies

Moth: A New Woodcut Print from Tugboat Printshop wood prints wood posters and prints moths illustration butterflies

Paul Roden and Valerie Lueth over at Pittsburgh-based Tugboat Printshop just announced a new woodcut print titled Moth. Shown in production here, the final piece will be a 2-color print measuring 18″ x 25″ and is now available for pre-order. Art and design blogs everywhere were smitten earlier this year with their equally beautiful Moon print. The duo also has an upcoming exhibition of woodcut prints at the Arm in Brooklyn, opening Thursday, November 7th.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/9aTCuIr2dTo/

MrKiff · Oct 17 '13

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

Nearly 155 years before CompuServe debuted the first animated gif in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau unveiled an invention called the Phenakistoscope, a device that is largely considered to be the first mechanism for true animation. The simple gadget relied on the persistence of vision principle to display the illusion of images in motion. Via Juxtapoz:

The phenakistoscope used a spinning disc attached vertically to a handle. Arrayed around the disc’s center were a series of drawings showing phases of the animation, and cut through it were a series of equally spaced radial slits. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. The scanning of the slits across the reflected images kept them from simply blurring together, so that the user would see a rapid succession of images that appeared to be a single moving picture.

Though Plateau is credited with inventing the device, there were numerous other mathematicians and physicists who were working on similar ideas around the same time, and even they were building on the works of Greek mathematician Euclid and Sir Isaac Newton who had also identified principles behind the phenakistoscope.

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation
The moving image was only viewable through a narrow slit. Via Wikimedia Commons

So what kinds of things did people want to see animated as they peered into these curious motion devices? Lions eating people. Women morphing into witches. And some other pretty wild and psychedelic imagery, not unlike animated gifs today. Included here is a random selection of some of the first animated images. (via Juxtapoz, 2headedsnake)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/AdgXbh5pmh4/

MrKiff · Oct 17 '13

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Unveiled the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

Nearly 155 years before CompuServe debuted the first animated gif in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau unveiled an invention called the Phenakistoscope, a device that is largely considered to be the first mechanism for true animation. The simple gadget relied on the persistence of vision principle to display the illusion of images in motion. Via Juxtapoz:

The phenakistoscope used a spinning disc attached vertically to a handle. Arrayed around the disc’s center were a series of drawings showing phases of the animation, and cut through it were a series of equally spaced radial slits. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. The scanning of the slits across the reflected images kept them from simply blurring together, so that the user would see a rapid succession of images that appeared to be a single moving picture.

Though Plateau is credited with inventing the device, there were numerous other mathematicians and physicists who were working on similar ideas around the same time, and even they were building on the works of Greek mathematician Euclid and Sir Isaac Newton who had also identified principles behind the phenakistoscope.

So what kinds of things did people want to see animated as they peered into these curious motion devices? Lions eating people. Women morphing into witches. And some other pretty wild and psychedelic imagery, not unlike animated gifs today. Included here is a random selection of some of the first animated images. (via Juxtapoz, 2headedsnake)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/AdgXbh5pmh4/

MrKiff · Oct 17 '13

Surprising Layers of Color Revealed on Urban Walls  street art

Surprising Layers of Color Revealed on Urban Walls  street art

Surprising Layers of Color Revealed on Urban Walls  street art

I’m really enjoying these new pieces by artist 1010 that seems to peel away layers from mundane urban walls to reveal a depth of colorful layers. The Hamburg-based artist had a number of similar works on canvas at the Stroke Art Fair in Berlin in September.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/sQyxmTVewwo/

MrKiff · Oct 17 '13
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